About American College of Veterinary Radiology

  • The American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) was founded in 1961 under the laws of the state of Illinois as a non-profit organization of veterinary specialists in radiology to determine competence of voluntary candidates in veterinary radiology and to encourage the development of teaching personnel and training facilities in veterinary radiology.
  • Today the ACVR is the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recognized veterinary specialty organization™ for certification of Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Equine Diagnostic Imaging.
  • The ACVR undergoes a comprehensive evaluation by the American Board of Veterinary Specialties (ABVS) every three years to ensure that we are maintaining the required standards in our certification process for Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Equine Diagnostic Imaging.
  • To learn more about specialization in veterinary medicine, see the American Board of Veterinary Specialties of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

The ACVR is NOT an institution of higher education and is NOT authorized to award degrees or college credit. The objective of the ACVR is "the advancement of the art and science of radiology" by:

  • Protecting the public against incompetence in the practice of radiology, radiation oncology and equine diagnostic Imaging by conducting investigations and examinations to determine the competence of voluntary candidates for certificates issued by the College.
  • Conferring certification upon candidates who have successfully demonstrated their proficiency in the field of veterinary radiology, radiation oncology and equine diagnostic imaging.
  • Encouraging the development of teaching personnel and training facilities in veterinary radiology, radiation oncology, and equine diagnostic imaging.
  • Providing guidelines and approving residencies, training programs and fellowships in the field of veterinary radiology, radiation oncology and equine diagnostic imaging under consideration by the Council on Education of the AVMA.
  • Advising veterinarians who desire certification in the field of veterinary radiology, radiation oncology and equine diagnostic imaging as to the course of study and training to be pursued.

As of October 15, 2019, the ACVR membership includes 723 active Diplomates. There are 608 Diplomates in Radiology, 98 Diplomates in Radiation Oncology, 17 Diplomates holding dual certification, and 318 Society Only Members. The College has 4 Emeritus, 31 Retired, and 1 Associate Member. There are 156 Resident Members-in-Training; 125 Residents in Radiology and 31 in Radiation Oncology. The ACVR also sponsors four specialty societies. The Veterinary Ultrasound Society (VUS) has 755 members, the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine (SVNM) has 118 members, the CT/MRI Society has 684 members, and the Large Animal Diagnostic Imaging Society (LADIS) has 359 members.